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INFO: Electrical

 

ELECTRICAL

 
 In this Section:
  • Split-charge and domestic wiring
  • Alternators
  • Flasher Units
  • Ignition Leads
  • Heater Resistor Packs
  • Electronic Ignition Module
  • Headlights - difference between LHD and RHD

SPLIT - CHARGE AND DOMESTIC (FRIDGE ETC) WIRING

There are some rather strange views out there on how Auxiliary charging is best accomplished, and there is a tremendous wealth of highly technical information on the web regarding battery (accumulator) charging characteristics which I have no intention of repeating here. There are however a few basic principles and observations which should be considered (dealing with standard lead-acid batteries here)
  1. In order to charge effectively a battery requires both volts AND amps.
  2. The voltage must be in the region of 14-14.5 for maximum charge current to be accepted.
  3. Above 14.5 volts excessive gassing will occur. This may be acceptable if you check your electrolyte levels regularly but not for sealed batteries
  4. Voltage Drop (the amount of volts "lost" between source and destination) is directly proportional to 3 factors
    1. Cable run length
    2. Cable diameter
    3. Current (AMPs) being drawn
  5. The standard "Split charge" relays that you can buy for caravans etc are barely adequate as they tend to be installed with too long cable runs and with insufficient cable cross section to prevent considerable voltage drop. The voltage drop prevents the auxiliary battery from drawing much current and the battery will not be recharged quickly.
  6. There are electro-mechanical devices which when installed with sufficient grade wiring (eg 16mm2 cross section) can ensure the auxiliary battery is charged at the appropriate voltage and amps, but these cost several hundreds of pounds.
  7. It is better to supply charge current to the Auxiliary battery and fridge independently , ie through separate relays direct from the power source (either main battery or alternator) rather than drawing the fridge power from the Auxiliary battery (as some manufacturers do).
  8. If you wire the relay trigger wire to the same terminal on the alternator as used by the ignition lamp this will switch on the relays only when the engine is running.

Standard Split-charge and fridge wiring improvement:

Here is a basic wiring from an 1991 talisman using standard 12v "split charge" and 30Amp relays. The cable runs were very long, and the wiring standard 30Amp type as can be purchased in motorists shops. The original performance was very poor, necessitating the use of a hookup every 2-3 days even though we have very little power consumption. The modified circuit performance was much improved. HOWEVER it was all replaced with huge wiring and relays later which increased the performance to a fantastic level and we no longer require hook ups at all when touring.

2010 Upgrade:

As can be seen below this alternator's output is already deliberately regulated to a high voltage to get a much higher charge current into the battery and should be very capable of rapidly charging a heavily discharge leisure battery provided adequate cabling is installed to minimise the voltage drop at high currents.  To ensure this I have removed the original 25amp fused split-charge wiring and installed 16sq mm (120Amp) cable, a 100A heavy duty relay, and two 80Amp fuses with the total cable length of less than 70cm from alternator to leisure battery.

Results:

a) With both batteries charged the volt readings are: 
Primary: 14.58v ,  Leisure battery: 14.57v
  This is impressive but to be expected with both batteries charged as voltage-drop through cables is directly proportional to current flow (which is  minimal in this scenario). 

b) With the 85Ah battery significantly discharged (having drawn off 30Ah) the initial charge voltages are:
Primary: 14.58v ,  Leisure battery: 14.43v
  (and rising steadily as the battery charges). Now this is impressive as original factory-fitted split-charge relay with its long and much thinner cabling could only reach 13.8v at the leisure battery under these conditions which resulted in slow leisure battery recharging despite the high alternator output.

 

2011 Upgrade:

The switching was handled by a Smartcom VSR (voltage sensing relay) that connects at 13.5v and disconnects at 12.8v. This is the orange unit shown on the left of the photo opposite.

The VSR prevents a discharged Auxillary battery from preventing the main battery from starting the engine and removes the excessive load on the Alternator's low-tension circuit (which has been suggested might cause the LT circuit diodes to fail prematurely (dim glow on dashboard warning light despite normal charge).

Right: SmartCom VSR mounted above main battery.
Far Right: Aux battery showing 200Amp Wiring, 100Amp Relay (upper left) and 80Amp Maxi fuse connected to battery (the other one is a short distance away where the wiring connects to the Starter Solenoid feed from the Alternator)

   
 
2012 Note: the Smartcom failed after only a few weeks so the relays have been wired directly to the ignition for the moment (not the the warning light on the alternator so as not to overload the warning light diodes.

 

 OPTIMISED SPLIT-CHARGE SYSTEM 2011

Objective:

Achieved by:
To minimise voltage drop to the auxiliary battery when very high currents are being drawn  (Voltage drop is proportional to Current flow, cable diameter, and length)
  • Keep cable runs as short as possible. In my case connect the Auxiliary charge cable to the back of the starter motor when the massive cable from the Alternator is connected).

  • Use VERY heavy duty cables (e.g. 16mm square ) and large connectors to minimise volt drop at high current rates.

 

To maximise the current reaching the auxillary battery (charge rate is proportional to both VOLTAGE and CURRENT)
  • Maintain charge voltage at 14.3+ voltage even under high current loads.

  • Use very heavy duty cables capable of carrying high currents.

  • Use only low resistance zero-volt-drop components in the charge circuit.

  • Use a switching Relay to Switch the domestic load (e.g. fridge, phone chargers etc)  from the Auxiliary power circuit to the main vehicle battery when the auxiliary battery is being charged. This ensures ALL charge power goes to the battery and none is passed from its terminals to the interior appliances.

 

To prevent a heavily discharged auxiliary battery from preventing the vehicle from starting the engine
  • Isolating the Auxiliary battery bank from the starter battery until the engine is running and disconnecting it when the draw on the main battery pulls the voltage down low (e.g. ticking over with the lights on and the fridge drawing power).  This is done by using a Voltage-Sensing Relay that switches on (makes contact) at 13+ volts, and disengages at 12.8v ....update: VSR burned out after a couple of weeks due to "cycling" on/off rapidly at tickover with high load. The PAS electric pump and Main charge relays are now wired directly to the ignition (not the alt warning lamp to prevent overloading the warning lamp diode pack in that).

Maintain operational safety and robustness (reliability)
  • Heavy duty (80Amp) fuses mounted at both ends of the charge circuit.

  • 100+ Heavy Duty Relays used.

  • Heavy duty (at least 200Amp) cables used

  • Mounted securely to ensure cables cannot chaff on other items when driving.

  • Protected against water ingress due to forward movement and/or splashes.

 

 

 

ALTERNATOR CROSS-REFERENCE CHART

 

Regulators:
For Paris Rhone / Valeo etc Typically Part No5791.67 (as shown opposite) but check before purchase as some alternators are different.

Link to UK Supplier (there may be others)  Here
 

 

 

STANDARD FITMENT (2 Litre Petrol, ALL Models and Years)

FRA114 is a Quinton Hazell part No (see cross-reference chart above)

 

 

Alternator Commissioning Report:

FRA 114 (QH part no) 50Amp unit fitted to Petrol Versions:

Notes:

> High Voltage Regulator setting of 14.58 Volts (good for fast charging).
> Power output measured at 61 Amps even though the unit is officially sold as 50Amp.
> The performance curve relates to Alternator RPM which is approx twice engine RPM.

 

ALTERNATOR UPGRADE OPTION  to 70/75 Amp Unit (2 Litre Petrol, ALL Models and Years)

With thanks to "Taz-Blitz" on the Talbotoc.com forum for researching and demonstrating that this could be done.
Alternator Taken From:

FIAT DUCATO 10 1.9 DIESEL 1994-98
FIAT DUCATO 10 1.9 DIESEL TURBO 1994-98
FIAT DUCATO 14 1.9 DIESEL TURBO 1994-98

Additional Parts Required:

  • The Pulley from your original alternator.
  • 140-150mm long bolt with Nyloc nut for the upper pivot
  • 20mm Spacer. This fits between the front upper mounting lug of the alternator and the engine bracket to ensure the pulleys line up correctly.
  • Couple of Thick washers for the tensioner at the bottom.
  • Electrical Connectors: one large-hole wire connector for the starter cable and one small hole for thehe low-tension cable

Tools Required:

  • Allen key: 8mm or  5/6AF to hold shaft on new alt.
  • A vice
  • 15/16AF or 24mm spanner / Socket on new alt. nut
  • 7/8AF spanner on Old alt. nut. ( pulley held gently in vice )
  • 2 x 17mm spanners
  • 2 x 13mm spanners
  • 8mm spanner/socket for the LT connector on the Alternator.
Part No Cross Reference:

DELCO REMY EXC DRA3646
HELLA REF CA1258
LUCAS ELSTOCK LRB00292
LUCAS EXC LRB292
WOODS ALT12013
FIAT 46430110
FIAT 46434930
IVECO 1305709080
IVECO 1315060080
MAGNETIC MARELLI 63321205
MAGNETIC MARELLI 63321276
MAGNETIC MARELLI 63321361
MAGNETIC MARELLI 63321617
MAGNETIC MARELLI 943321617
QH REF FRA943
QX REF QA3187
RML PART No. 100-055
SOVEREIGN SA050
VALEO 437851

Here is a photo of my uprated Alternator installation (Full write-up will follow one day)

Taz-Blitz's Alternator Upgrade
original Post here: http://www.talbotoc.com/post67118.html#p67118 )

Image

Fitting instructions and more pictures will follow when I have done my own version.  In the meantime see Taz-Blitz's write up here: http://www.talbotoc.com/post67118.html#p67118

Stirling Advanced Digital Alternator Regulator

I have been in communication with Stirling Power Products about using their "advanced digital alternator regulator" as the instructions for this state that the  standard alternator should produce between 13.5 and 14.5 volts (mine is regulated at 14.58v)

Stirling advised that my current voltage output was too high and would result in "destroying my batteries" (which has not occurred despite 6  years usage like this! ).  They recommended I use of their split-charge diodes which would induce a voltage drop of 0.8v (compare to the existing 100Amp heavy duty relay and wiring which has only a 0.01 volt drop). 

I would not use a split charge diode as research has shown that voltage drop is directly proportional to current flow, therefore whilst the volt drop to the leisure battery may indeed be 0.8v the main vehicle battery will not experience anything like this. In this scenario the advanced regulator will bring the voltage up to 14.8 at the discharged leisure battery by making the alternator work at 15.6v to compensate for the split charge diode, and the vehicle's main battery will receive almost all of this voltage (at a much lower current as it is not discharged).  The result would be severe boiling of the vehicle's primary battery.

If you do your research you will find this main battery over-voltage situation is well-documented, even (surprisingly) on Stirling's own website where they make the case for purchasing their latest and very expensive zero volt drop equipment!.

In conclusion: This alternator's output is already deliberately regulated to a high voltage to get a much higher charge current into the battery and should be very capable of rapidly charging a heavily discharge leisure battery provided adequate cabling is installed to minimise the voltage drop at high currents.  To ensure this I have removed the original 25amp fused split-charge wiring and installed 16sq mm (120Amp) cable, a 100A heavy duty relay, and two 80Amp fuses with the total cable length of less than 70cm from alternator to leisure battery.

 

 

 

2.5 DIESEL ENGINE VERSION  (for info)

 


- Note the different dimensions and bracket hole.
Not interchangeable with the Petrol version.

 

 

Electro-Mechanical Flasher Unit
(as Fitted to 1991 onwards 2.0 Petrol Model).
This version is fitted behind the Dashboard.
There is also a 4-Pin version which is usually fitted behind the glovebox


 

 

 

 

Terminal reference guide.

UK/USA

Germany

France

Japan

Supply

X, B, +

49, 15

+

B

Earth

-, E

31

-

E

Indicator switch

L

49a

C, COMM

L

Vehicle warning lamp

P

C

R, Rep

 

Trailer warning lamp

 

C2

R2

 

So the "X" Above can be shown as either "X" , "B" , or "+"

Peugeot Part no: 632321
(Peugeot Price at Feb 2011 is £31.81 inc VAT !)

(Possibly shares flasher unit with
Peugeot 632 321 205 309 )

Some examples of aftermarket Replacements:

502096 (as fitted to certain LandRovers)
Do a web search on 502096 for suppliers.
Thanks to Jon Chappell for identifying that one.Very cheap too!


QH Part No:  XFL119
- 21x2/21x4 Max 84

Cross References:
Intermotor part no: 58861

Lucas Part no: SFB169 

Unconfirmed Cross-References:
FIAT Part No: 4347645
SKODA Part No: 115-922089 and 443319600005

 Possibly: RING Electrical, Model RFL4  although some people have reported compatibility issues with this one)

 

 

 

Similar Pin Configuration but NOT suitable QH Parts
XFL103 - 21x2+(5W) (indicators Only)
XFL109  / XFL136 - 21x4 Max 98 (Hazards Only)
XFL114 / XFL133- 21x6 (+2x5) Max 140 (hazards Only?)
XFL118/XFL134 - 42W (Indicators Only)

Resources:

OnLine INTERMOTOR Catalogue can be found here:
http://www.intermotor.co.uk/

QH Parts Catalogue with Pin Diagrams and Cross-References (in PDF Format) is here:
http://www2.qha.com/catalogues/ZC8.pdf

 

IGNITION LEADS

Search for Part number: OEF317

 

 

7mm Silicon "High Volt" OEF317 typically £20 delivered free on Amazon (search for "OEF317" )

 


 

Heater Resistor Packs / Fan Motor Speed Control

(with Thermal Cut out) Post 91 models

Fan Control: (1991 shown in Russek Pocket Mechanic manual Page 160, Grid 38, Item no 859 ( and the switch immediately above it...item no. 183) Both the switch and the resistor pack are on the Earth Side of the circuit. The 12v positive coming from the ignition switch via fuse 9.

The Resistor Pack is located on the Right-hand side of the heater unit under the dashboard and is held in place by 3 screws. It can easily be removed. The resistor pack has 4 connectors, 3 out and 1 in ( or the other way round depending on how you view it seeing as it is on the Earth side )

The 3 resistors (either separate coils or in the green block as shown below)  are added in series depending on which of the 3 outputs(/Inputs) you have selected via the fan switch. But ALL flow though the thermal fuse connected to the single input (/output). You can check the item on the RS components website (search for 184c) it is virtually identical for the green unit.

The rotary fan switch has 5 connectors: 1 is not connected (the OFF position). The one on the far side is connected directly to Earch by passing the resistor block for Full(!) power. So.. the thermal fuse (small thin silver cylindrical thingy in photos) is in play only when the resistor pack is being utilised.

A blown resistor pack will manifest itself as the Fan only operating on full power (as opposed to a blown fuse when the fan won't work at all). The coiled resistor packs usually fail due to an accumulation of debris building up on the coils causing them to short out and overheat. The actual "blowing" of the resistor pack may be accompanied by smoke and the acrid smell of burning electrics coming from the heater vents in the dashboard which is rather alarming when it occurs.

Resetting the Resisistor Pack
With thanks to "Bruce" on the Preloved forum

If you put the resistor pack in your freezer (in a plastic bag to keep the moisture out) you may find that it will re-set the thermal fuse.
I have tried this myself with the exposed coil version (shown above Left) and it worked.   .

   
LINKS

Wire Size Calculator (Essential for preventing excessive voltage drop and therefore poor charging of the auxiliary battery) http://www.gtsparkplugs.com/WireSizeCalc.html
Stirling Advanced Alternator Regulator (this is the cheapest supplier I have found (so far) http://www.jgtech.com/alternators.htm
Increasing your Alternator Charge Voltage Manually (if you need to). This is an interesting article on manually doing what the Stirling advanced regulator does electronically. http://www.smartgauge.co.uk/alt_mod.html
Stirling Power Products Recommend you read their instructions and articles on all charge devices they sell. Obviously they are trying to sell you something but there is a lot of useful information in there and if your alternator is in the 13.8v range and your usage pattern demands it then their regulator or other supplementary charge devices may be worthwhile http://www.sterling-power.com/
JCR Supplies (AutoElectrician).REGULATOR Supplier Considerably cheaper than a recon Alternator if only the Regulator brushes are worn out. http://www.jcrsupplies.co.uk
     
 


ELECTRONIC IGNITION AMPLIFICATION MODULE

7 - Pin, Bosch or 6 - Pin Ducellier (both interchangeable)

PART NUMBERS.

ALFA. 116 97 65(6) 079 00/01, BOSCH 0227010002/008/018. CITROEN 91 504 912 (944)80/ 7910035100. LUCAS DAB201, CI, XEI5, INTERMOTOR 15010, PEUGEOT 5945.02/03/25/31/33/39/45/48.  5927.90. ROVER BAU5332.

Talbot Express Part number (Peugeot) is 5945.48 costing £85 in Jan 2009

MotorFactor Parts: (should cost approx £20)
Intermotor Part Number 15010
Hella Part Number: 5DA 006 623-001

 

Vehicle Application Guide (these units are all interchangeable)
 
 
Vehicle Model Year Usage
ALFA ROMEO 164 2.0i T.Spark 87-92 Bos
ALFA ROMEO 33 1.2 83-92 Bos
ALFA ROMEO 33 1.2 83-90 Duc
ALFA ROMEO 33 1.3 (Carb.) 83-90 Bos
ALFA ROMEO 33 1.3 (Carb.) 83-90 Duc
ALFA ROMEO 33 1.4 i.e 90-95 Bos
ALFA ROMEO 33 1.5 (Carb.) 83-90 Bos
ALFA ROMEO 33 1.5 (Carb.) 83-90 Duc
ALFA ROMEO 33 1.5 i.e 87-90 Duc
ALFA ROMEO 33 1.5 i.e 87-95 Bos
ALFA ROMEO 33 1.7 i.e 1990-92 Bos
ALFA ROMEO 6 2.0 V6 84-87 Bos
ALFA ROMEO 6 2.5 V6 80-86 Bos
ALFA ROMEO 6 2.5 V6 i.e (Cat.) 1983-87 Bos
ALFA ROMEO 75 1.6 (Carb.) 85-91 Bos
ALFA ROMEO 75 1.8 Turbo 85-89 Bos
ALFA ROMEO 75 1.8 (Carb.) 85-91 Bos
ALFA ROMEO 75 1.8ie Turbo 85-92 Bos
ALFA ROMEO 75 2.0 (exc.T.Spark,Turbo) 85-89 Bos
ALFA ROMEO 75 2.0i T.Spark 87-92 Bos
ALFA ROMEO 75 2.5i V6 (Cat.) 86-90 Bos
ALFA ROMEO 75 2.5i V6 (exc.S, CH) 85-88 Bos
ALFA ROMEO 75 2.5i V6 (S, CH only) 85-88 Bos
ALFA ROMEO 75 3.0i V6 87-93 Bos
ALFA ROMEO 90 1.8 84-87 Bos
ALFA ROMEO 90 2.0 84-87 Bos
ALFA ROMEO 90 2.5 V6 (Carb.) 84-87 Bos
ALFA ROMEO 90 2.5i V6 (Cat.) 86-90 Bos
ALFA ROMEO 90 2.5i V6 (exc. S, CH) 85-88 Bos
ALFA ROMEO Alfasud 1.3 81-84 Duc
ALFA ROMEO Alfasud 1.3 82-84 Bos
ALFA ROMEO Alfasud 1.3 i.e 82-84 Bos
ALFA ROMEO Alfasud 1.5 81-84 Duc
ALFA ROMEO Alfasud 1.5 82-84 Bos
ALFA ROMEO Alfetta 1.6 81-86 Bos
ALFA ROMEO Alfetta 1.8 81-86 Bos
ALFA ROMEO Alfetta 2.0 (Carb.) inc.GTV 81-84 Bos
ALFA ROMEO Alfetta 2.0i 83-85 Bos
ALFA ROMEO Arna 1.2 85-86 Bos
ALFA ROMEO Arna 1.2 85-86 Duc
ALFA ROMEO Arna 1.3 85-86 Bos
ALFA ROMEO Arna 1.3 85-86 Duc
ALFA ROMEO Arna 1.5 85-86 Bos
ALFA ROMEO Arna 1.5 85-86 Duc
ALFA ROMEO Giulietta 1.3 1981-86 Bos
ALFA ROMEO Giulietta 1.6 1981-86 Bos
ALFA ROMEO Giulietta 1.8 1981-86 Bos
ALFA ROMEO Giulietta 2.0 1981-86 Bos
ALFA ROMEO GTV 2.0 (Carb.) 1981-86 Bos
ALFA ROMEO GTV 2.5 V6 80-87 Bos
ALFA ROMEO Spider 1.6 Veloce 81-90 Bos
ALFA ROMEO Spider 2.0 Veloce (exc.2.0i) 1983-90 Bos
ALFA ROMEO Sprint 1.3 81-89 Bos
ALFA ROMEO Sprint 1.3 81-89 Duc
ALFA ROMEO Sprint 1.5 81-89 Bos
ALFA ROMEO Sprint 1.5 81-89 Duc
ALFA ROMEO Sprint 1.7 (Carb.) 87-89 Bos
ALFA ROMEO Sprint 1.7 i.e (Cat.) 87-90 Bos
BMW 316 (E21) 80-82 Bos
BMW 316 (E30) 82-88 Bos
BMW 316i (E30) 88-91 Bos
BMW 318i (E30) 8v 82-87 Bos
BMW 320 (E21) 80-82 Bos
BMW 320i (E30) 82-91 Bos
BMW 320i (E30) Cabriolet 87-94 Bos
BMW 320i (E30) Touring 87-94 Bos
BMW 323i (E21) 80-82 Bos
BMW 323i (E30) 82-85 Bos
BMW 323i (E30) Cabriolet 82-85 Bos
BMW 518i (E28) 80-88 Bos
BMW 520i (E28) 81-88 Bos
BMW 520i (E34) 88-91 Bos
BMW 525i (E28) 81-88 Bos
BMW 528i (E28) 81-88 Bos
BMW 628CSi (E24) 81-87 Bos
BMW 635CSi (E24) 80-84 Bos
BMW 728i (E23) 81-86 Bos
BMW 728i (E23) (M86) 79-82 Bos
CITROEN AX10 1.0,1.0i (-RP5283) 86-92 Duc
CITROEN AX10 1.0,1.0i (RP5284-) 86-92 Duc
CITROEN AX11 1.1i (-RP5283) 86-92 Duc
CITROEN AX11 1.1i (RP5284-) 86-92 Duc
CITROEN AX14 1.4,1.4i (-RP5283) 86-92 Duc
CITROEN AX14 1.4,1.4i (RP5284-) 86-92 Duc
CITROEN AX14 GTi (-RP5283) 86-92 Duc
CITROEN AX14 GTi (RP5284-) 86-92 Duc
CITROEN Axel 13 1.3 82-89 Duc
CITROEN BX11 1.1 87-93 Duc
CITROEN BX14 1.4 83-88 Duc
CITROEN BX14 1.4,1.4i 88-93 Duc
CITROEN BX16 1.6 (Carb.) 83-88 Duc
CITROEN BX16 1.6 (Carb.) 88-93 Duc
CITROEN BX19 1.9 (Carb.) 84-93 Duc
CITROEN BX19 1.9 GTi 8v 86-93 Duc
CITROEN BX19 1.9 GTi 16v 87-93 Duc
CITROEN BX19 1.9i exc.GTi 88-93 Duc
CITROEN CX20 2.0 85-87 Duc
CITROEN CX2000 2.0 82-85 Duc
CITROEN CX22 2.2 85-89 Duc
CITROEN CX2400 2.4 GTi 77-83 Duc
CITROEN CX25 2.5i exc.Turbo 84-90 Duc
CITROEN LNA 11 1.0 86-88 Duc
CITROEN LNA 11 1.1 82-86 Duc
CITROEN Visa 11 1.1 80-87 Duc
CITROEN Visa 12 1.2 81-83 Duc
CITROEN Visa 14 1.4 82-86 Duc
CITROEN XM 3.0i 12v V6 91-94 Duc
CITROEN XM 3.0i 24v 1994-> Duc
CITROEN XM 3.0i 24v V6 91-94 Duc
CITROEN ZX 1.9i 91-98 Duc
CITROEN (LCV) AX10 Van 1.0,1.0i 87-92 Duc
CITROEN (LCV) C15 1.0 (Carb.) 1985-> Duc
CITROEN (LCV) C15 1.1 (Carb.) 85-91 Duc
CITROEN (LCV) C15 1.3 (-RP4237) 1984-> Bos
CITROEN (LCV) C15 1.3 (-RP4237) 1984-> Duc
CITROEN (LCV) C15 1.4 (Carb.) 85-91 Duc
CITROEN (LCV) C25 1.8 (Carb.) 85-91 Duc
CITROEN (LCV) C25 2.0 (Carb.) 85-91 Duc
FIAT (LCV) Ducato 1.8 86-91 Bos
FIAT (LCV) Ducato 1.8 86-91 Duc
FIAT (LCV) Ducato 2.0 86-91 Bos
FIAT (LCV) Ducato 2.0 86-91 Duc
OPEL Astra 1.4i 8v 91-98 Bos
OPEL Vectra A 1.4 88-90 Bos
OPEL (LCV) Astravan,Astramax 1.4i 8v 91-98 Bos
PEUGEOT 104 1.0 (Electronic Ign.) 81-85 Duc
PEUGEOT 104 1.1 (Electronic Ign.) 81-85 Duc
PEUGEOT 104 1.2 79-85 Duc
PEUGEOT 104 1.4 81-85 Duc
PEUGEOT 205 1.0 (Carb.) 83-92 Duc
PEUGEOT 205 1.1 (Carb.) 83-92 Duc
PEUGEOT 205 1.3 87-91 Duc
PEUGEOT 205 1.4 (Carb.) 83-91 Duc
PEUGEOT 205 1.5 84-90 Bos
PEUGEOT 205 1.6 (Carb.) 86-91 Duc
PEUGEOT 205 1.6i (inc.GTi) 84-91 Duc
PEUGEOT 205 1.9i (inc.GTi) 87-94 Duc
PEUGEOT 305 1.5 82-88 Duc
PEUGEOT 305 1.5 82-88 Mag
PEUGEOT 305 1.6 83-87 Mag
PEUGEOT 305 1.6 83-90 Duc
PEUGEOT 305 1.9 82-88 Duc
PEUGEOT 309 1.1 86-92 Duc
PEUGEOT 309 1.3 86-91 Duc
PEUGEOT 309 1.4 91-93 Duc
PEUGEOT 309 1.5 87-93 Bos
PEUGEOT 309 1.6 (Carb.) 86-93 Duc
PEUGEOT 309 1.6i (exc.Cat) 86-93 Bos
PEUGEOT 309 1.9 16v 90-92 Duc
PEUGEOT 309 1.9i 8v 87-92 Duc
PEUGEOT 309 1.9i 8v 91-92 Bos
PEUGEOT 405 1.4 (Carb.) 87-92 Duc
PEUGEOT 405 1.4i 87-93 Duc
PEUGEOT 405 1.6 (Carb.) 88-92 Duc
PEUGEOT 405 1.9 (Carb.) 88-92 Duc
PEUGEOT 405 1.9i 8v 88-92 Duc
PEUGEOT 405 1.9i 16v 88-92 Duc
PEUGEOT 505 1.8 (Carb.) 85-86 Duc
PEUGEOT 505 2.0 (Carb.) 85-92 Duc
PEUGEOT 505 2.0 (Carb.) 86-88 Mag
PEUGEOT 605 2.0i 89-91 Duc
PEUGEOT 605 2.0i 90-91 Bos
PEUGEOT (LCV) 205 Van 1.1 (Carb) 83-91 Duc
PEUGEOT (LCV) 305 1.5 Van 82-88 Duc
PEUGEOT (LCV) 305 1.5 Van 82-88 Mag
PEUGEOT (LCV) 305 1.6 Van 86-91 Bos
PEUGEOT (LCV) 305 1.6 Van 86-91 Duc
PEUGEOT (LCV) 504 1.6,2.0 Pick-up 85-90 Duc
PEUGEOT (LCV) Express 1.8 86-91 Duc
PEUGEOT (LCV) Express 2.0 86-91 Duc
PEUGEOT (LCV) J5 Van 1.8,2.0 86-90 Duc
RENAULT 25 2.7i V6 (B298) 84-92 Bos
TALBOT 150 75-84 Bos
TALBOT 150 75-84 Duc
TALBOT Alpine 1.3,1.5,1.6 75-84 Bos
TALBOT Alpine 1.3,1.5,1.6 75-84 Duc
TALBOT Horizon 1.1,1.3,1.5,1.6 78-86 Bos
TALBOT Horizon 1.1,1.3,1.5,1.6 78-86 Duc
TALBOT Matra Murena 80-86 Duc
TALBOT Minx 1.6 84-86 Bos
TALBOT Minx 1.6 84-86 Duc
TALBOT Murena 1.6 75-84 Bos
TALBOT Murena 1.6 75-84 Duc
TALBOT Rapier 1.6 84-86 Bos
TALBOT Rapier 1.6 84-86 Duc
TALBOT Samba 1.0 83-86 Duc
TALBOT Samba 1.1,1.4 81-86 Bos
TALBOT Samba 1.1,1.4 81-86 Duc
TALBOT Simca 1307 78-86 Duc
TALBOT Simca 1308 78-86 Duc
TALBOT Solara 1.3,1.5,1.6 80-84 Duc
TALBOT Tagora 2.2 81-84 Bos
TALBOT Tagora 2.2 81-84 Duc
VAUXHALL Astra 1.4i 8v (Bosch Coil) 91-98 Bos
VAUXHALL Cavalier 1.4 Mk.III 88-90 Bos
VAUXHALL (LCV) Astravan,Astramax 1.4i 8v 91-98 Bos
YUGO 55 1.1 87-91 Caj
YUGO 55 1.1 GLS 84-87 Caj
YUGO 65 1.3 88-91 Caj
YUGO (LCV) 55 1.1 Van 87-91 Caj
 


HEADLIGHTS (LHD or RHD)
 

I don't have time to write up an exhaustive guide but basically RHD units have not been available for many years. You CAN but LHD units and attach your RHD lens, or you can fit a PAIR of LHD units and use beam deflectors (this IS allowable in the MOT (as of March 2017, in may change in the future but is unlikely to).

 

How to tell them apart

 

 
 

 

   

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